[Free Textbooks] The Dragon ScrollAuthor I.J. Parker – Z55z.co

Life in 11th century Japan can be fascinating at least if it is related by I J Parker in The Dragon Scroll Thank you GR friend, Carol, for suggesting this one It is no joking matter, cried Seimei After years of disappointment, you got this chance to make a name for yourself.Remember, the path to success makes for a long and troublesome journey, but the way back is quick and easy Seimei is an old retainer to the Sugawara family He is speaking to Akitada Sugawara, a young nobleman The Life in 11th century Japan can be fascinating at least if it is related by I J Parker in The Dragon Scroll Thank you GR friend, Carol, for suggesting this one It is no joking matter, cried Seimei After years of disappointment, you got this chance to make a name for yourself.Remember, the path to success makes for a long and troublesome journey, but the way back is quick and easy Seimei is an old retainer to the Sugawara family He is speaking to Akitada Sugawara, a young nobleman The noble family has fallen if favor and money is in short supply Akitada is a junior clerk in the Ministry of Justice a fortunate position that only came to him because of his achieving a first in the university exams We follow him in his mission and see how he augments his team in pursuit of those who would cheat the Emperor out of his taxes Akitada s youth might have made him an unlikely inspector, but both his university training and his drudgery in the archives of the Ministry of Justice had thoroughly prepared him to search out, understand, and evaluate every financial transaction, from the collection of the smallest fine to the confiscation of land and property Yet he is young, and at times, very focused on himself This gives us internal conflicts as well as external challenges.The story is told in a straight forward manner, and for those familiar with stories of ancient Japan and China, the character types offer no surprises So, I was surprised that I found The Dragon Scroll both appealing and compelling As Akitada finds his assignment growing in complexity, he relies on an augmented team of interesting characters that help fill out how it was in ancient Japan Since this is Akitada s first journey away from the capitol, we experience how he reacts to provincial ways and customs There is plenty of drama, deceit and duress to overcome How all that is accomplished is enlightening and satisfying Summary The third in the series by I.J Parker, The Dragon Scroll features young Sugawara Akitada, an impoverished samurai of noble birth serving as a government clerk at the Ministry of Justice Sugawara is assigned to investigate the disappearance of tax convoys in the distant province of Kazusa, a seemingly impossible mission He is accompanied by his loyal family retainer and trusted companion, Seimei Along the way, Sugawara and Seimei befriend Tora, an army deserter who becomes his servant Summary The third in the series by I.J Parker, The Dragon Scroll features young Sugawara Akitada, an impoverished samurai of noble birth serving as a government clerk at the Ministry of Justice Sugawara is assigned to investigate the disappearance of tax convoys in the distant province of Kazusa, a seemingly impossible mission He is accompanied by his loyal family retainer and trusted companion, Seimei Along the way, Sugawara and Seimei befriend Tora, an army deserter who becomes his servant, and a familiar character in the Sugawara Akitada series.Sugawara must exercise his full powers of diplomacy as he examines the accounts of the outgoing governor Fujiwara Motosuke, soon to be father in law of the Emperor and confronts Master Joto, the Abbot of the local temple It is while hunting down the lost tax convoys, that Sugawara comes across evidence of several seemingly unrelated murders that of a lady in waiting of the imperial household in the capital, of a retired former governor of Kazusa province, of local prostitutes in Fujisawa and Kazusa provinces.Fortunately, Sugawara s good nature and honesty win him friends and allies He is accompanied by his loyal family retainer and trusted companion, Seimei Along the way, Sugawara befriends Tora, an army deserter who becomes his servant, and a familiar character in the Sugawara Akitada series Sugawara is also aided by Higekuro, a crippled instructor in martial arts and Higekuro s two lovely and unconventional daughters.Review I like escapist fiction very much and I m partial to detective novels that are set in an unusual time or place The Sugawara Akitada series, set in Ancient Japan, piqued my interest immediately The style and language fully communicate a different time and place The dialogue, interaction between the characters, the description of landscape, customs, and culture work so that you are always aware that the action is going on in a very different time and place However, at the same time, Sugawara and his colleagues are very accessible and I found myself sympathizing with their problems, heartaches, and difficulties and hoping for their triumphs I recommend this book to anyone looking for an unusual detective series and with a fondness for Japanese history and culture Fascinating both because it is set in 11th century Japan and also because of the well developed characters As a mystery lover, I m well aware that typically if the mystery s good, the characters are mere caricatures,or if the characters are fully realized, the mystery s lame In this instance, Parker s produced a wonderful novel where both the mystery and the characters are complex and satisfying Can t wait to readin the Akitada series. Now after reading that synopsis you would think this is a book full of wonderfully fun characters set in a totally unfamiliar world to most readers, and you would be half right This is an unfamiliar world to most of us and because of that I find myself not really caring for the characters all that much The men tend to be sexist and overly hung up on class and how people fit into categories that are neither flexible or forgiving The women are either meek and seeking protection from the men o Now after reading that synopsis you would think this is a book full of wonderfully fun characters set in a totally unfamiliar world to most readers, and you would be half right This is an unfamiliar world to most of us and because of that I find myself not really caring for the characters all that much The men tend to be sexist and overly hung up on class and how people fit into categories that are neither flexible or forgiving The women are either meek and seeking protection from the men or devious vixens bent on eliminating anything in their way Now there is one exception to that last part and for that I m honestly grateful to the writer Ayako is actually a fearless warrior woman who teaches martial arts and sleeps with whoever she chooses to, but in the end she is still forced to play by the rules and marry a man that is acceptable class wise as opposed to who she might really want to be with.Now this isn t the fault of the charcters, the time the story is set in is to blame This was a time period where women had their place and class was so culturally ingrained that it s part of who they are It s not fair to read a book, set in another time and place, and judge it by todays standards equality and social justice Of course it s always easy to say that, then to actually, on some level, not react to what you are reading using your own moral compass.Now, after all that, if you think I didn t enjoy this book, then you are very much mistaken Regardless of what I think of Akitada as a person, I found this to be a wonderfuly crafted mystery filled with missing gold and murder all around The author has crafted a wonderfully intricate story with so many layers, you aren t really able to see how they work together until the story is over Once the solution is sprung on you, you may just end up kicking yourself in the ass for not figuring out why the prologue was important or relevant to the rest of the story.I m really looking forward to the rest of the series, one of which I ve already read, but will be reading again in order Because of that unfair advantage I can tell you that Akitada does becomelikeable as the books go on and as he matures I would recomend this series to anyone who enjoyes a well crafted mystery set in a beautifully imagined world I was very excited to find a mystery series set in medieval Japan I thought for sure that it was going to be a good book based on the reviews I had read but I couldn t even finish it I m not sure if this was affected by the fact that I listened to it instead of reading the story but I found it tedious and frustrating and the characters were annoying in the extreme and very stereotypical I can t say much about the plot or the story as I didn t make it that far but after listening to the end it I was very excited to find a mystery series set in medieval Japan I thought for sure that it was going to be a good book based on the reviews I had read but I couldn t even finish it I m not sure if this was affected by the fact that I listened to it instead of reading the story but I found it tedious and frustrating and the characters were annoying in the extreme and very stereotypical I can t say much about the plot or the story as I didn t make it that far but after listening to the end it felt a little predictable As an avid fan of everything that is Japanese,my first thought when i saw this book in the shelves of my local bookstore was OMG SAMURAIS JAPANESE CULTURE KARATE.PLus,when you add a mistery that is normally associated with modern PI novels,i just had to have it home.But,you cant judge a book by its covers and title,and caracters,and synopsis.The book is good.The caracters are good.The dialogue is cursive and it s highly readable,but it s justbland.The writing has actually nothing special As an avid fan of everything that is Japanese,my first thought when i saw this book in the shelves of my local bookstore was OMG SAMURAIS JAPANESE CULTURE KARATE.PLus,when you add a mistery that is normally associated with modern PI novels,i just had to have it home.But,you cant judge a book by its covers and title,and caracters,and synopsis.The book is good.The caracters are good.The dialogue is cursive and it s highly readable,but it s justbland.The writing has actually nothing special.And,maybe ,the most annoying thing is that..there s no japanese culture in it.I mean,yeah,you have the story center in the 700 1000 period of Japan,but the author doesnt capture anyhting from Japan at all.Better saying,if you switch out the names of the caracters,you wont even tell that the whole plot happens in Japan.There s no description.I mean,not a single description of buildings,places,customs,religion except the buddhism part,but that one is vital to the plot its bland.3 stars 3.5 starsI had a friend recommend this series and this is the first one I read I don t know why I started with 3 I must have had a brain freeze but I had no trouble in appreciating the story The mystery was almost too easy I had it figured out before I was half way through.Still it was interesting in reading a novel set in eleventh century Japan and Sugawara Akitada is an engaging hero The minor characters were well developed and the enitre novel entertaining I look forward to reading mor 3.5 starsI had a friend recommend this series and this is the first one I read I don t know why I started with 3 I must have had a brain freeze but I had no trouble in appreciating the story The mystery was almost too easy I had it figured out before I was half way through.Still it was interesting in reading a novel set in eleventh century Japan and Sugawara Akitada is an engaging hero The minor characters were well developed and the enitre novel entertaining I look forward to readingbut I hope the mystery part improves In an adventure filled with highway bandits, unscrupulous politicians, and renegade monks, The Dragon Scroll introduces readers to the lively world of eleventh century Japan and an irrepressible hero Sugawara Akitada On his first official assignment, Akitada an impoverished nobleman and earnest young government clerk in the Ministry of Justice is sent from the capital cit Meh I found the characters to be pretty stereotypical young, naive nobleman faithful but cranky servant femme fatale tomboy The plot was mildly interesting, and the details about medieval Japan were, too Not sure the author captures the sensibilities of the era, though. Brilliantly written, Parker s prose is engaging and thought provoking.