[ ePUB ] BroAuthor Helen Chebatte – Z55z.co

Romeo knows the rulesStick with your own kind Don t dob on your mates, or even your enemiesBut even unwritten rules are made for breakingFight Clubs, first loves and family ties are pushed to their limit in Helen Chebatte s explosive debut novel really enjoyed this one and it made me cry Romeo was a good character and i jumped on board with his story from the beginning. A straightforward, contemporary novel of different racial groups colliding in the school yard, resulting in a fight club and unexpected tragedies Chebatte nails the jargon associated with South European Middle Eastern males if in Melbourne, muzzas might be a good word to use Bro speaks at a level intended for easy consumption. A gritty read, with themes as diverse as identity, loss and the power of peer pressure This is a fairly slim volume, with lots of dialogue, and a familiar setting so I ll be recommending this to reluctant readers who require a text suitable for NCEA. I hope we don t have to wait long for Helen Chebatte s next novel To echo Trisha, she s fresh OZ YA talent to watch Her use of a school boy fight club as her underlying plot enables her to skilfully interweave a number of themes friendship, racial rivalry and peer pressure into a modern day morality tale, without exactly clubbing you over the head with it Chebatte s easy style will appeal to a broad readership, and should be a particular hit with reluctant readers It s a book that made m I hope we don t have to wait long for Helen Chebatte s next novel To echo Trisha, she s fresh OZ YA talent to watch Her use of a school boy fight club as her underlying plot enables her to skilfully interweave a number of themes friendship, racial rivalry and peer pressure into a modern day morality tale, without exactly clubbing you over the head with it Chebatte s easy style will appeal to a broad readership, and should be a particular hit with reluctant readers It s a book that made meempathetic to the themes it explored, and left me feeling hopeful A very important take on the racial hostilities between high school boys in Australia, Bro looks into the life of Romeo, a half Australian half Lebanese year 10 boy who just wants to get through school and get the girl But gossip is a nasty part of the high school experience, and before he knows it, Romeo is in the spotlight, caught in a war against the Aussie kids There s a choice to make, and Romeo isn t making any of the right ones Chebatte makes a poignant point about how in the end, we a A very important take on the racial hostilities between high school boys in Australia, Bro looks into the life of Romeo, a half Australian half Lebanese year 10 boy who just wants to get through school and get the girl But gossip is a nasty part of the high school experience, and before he knows it, Romeo is in the spotlight, caught in a war against the Aussie kids There s a choice to make, and Romeo isn t making any of the right ones Chebatte makes a poignant point about how in the end, we are all just people, and the day to day cultural differences don t affect that everyone can get along when we aren t being identified as our heritage and stereotypes Easy read with issues relevant to teenage boys Would teach to Year 9 boys. Bro is Helen Chebatte s debut novel Set in Western Sydney, the story revolves around Romeo Makhlouf, a sixteen year old boy attending a Christian boys high school He lives with his dad and grandmother His mother died of cancer five years ago and since then his father s moods have been up and down, creating a tense relationship between them When he s challenged by an Aussie boy at school, their fight sets off a train of events that leads to disaster.The main focus of Bro is identity a Bro is Helen Chebatte s debut novel Set in Western Sydney, the story revolves around Romeo Makhlouf, a sixteen year old boy attending a Christian boys high school He lives with his dad and grandmother His mother died of cancer five years ago and since then his father s moods have been up and down, creating a tense relationship between them When he s challenged by an Aussie boy at school, their fight sets off a train of events that leads to disaster.The main focus of Bro is identity and what that means to different people, in this case teenage boys and their families Romeo s father is Lebanese, his mother was Australian, and Romeo was born here He struggles throughout the book to understand who he really is His friendship group at school have pride in being Lebanese but he s often reminded of his mother s nationality and the fact that he was born here and takes part in Aussie ways of living as well as Lebanese There s a strong emphasis on family and respect, and his best friend, Diz, islike a brother than a mate.Romeo describes the four main groups of boys at his school, including his group, the Lebanese, the Islanders, the Asians, and the Aussies Each have their own areas and ways they interact with each other They have unwritten codes of how they are to deal with issues, with fights, and how things should be done It was easy to feel for Romeo who doesn t want to be pressured into fighting by his peer group, but feels like he has to conform.The ending is sad yet hopeful, and the resolution between Romeo and his father was mirrored in his interactions with boys at school Bro is an excellent novel, highlighting issues schools are facing It is a great read for high school students as well as teachers and parents.Thank you to Hardie Grant Egmont for my review copy Written in a language teens will relate to Bro delves into Australian identity and what that means to many different people.Attending a generic Christian boys high school, our main character Romeo finds himself having to fight to defend his Lebanese heritage in a school divided into four distinct groups Fobs fresh off the boat mainly islanders, Lebs Lebanese, Rez Asians and Ozzies.But what makes you a Leb when if you, as in Romeo s case, had an Australian mother and was born and live in Au Written in a language teens will relate to Bro delves into Australian identity and what that means to many different people.Attending a generic Christian boys high school, our main character Romeo finds himself having to fight to defend his Lebanese heritage in a school divided into four distinct groups Fobs fresh off the boat mainly islanders, Lebs Lebanese, Rez Asians and Ozzies.But what makes you a Leb when if you, as in Romeo s case, had an Australian mother and was born and live in Australia This novel is fascinating for its melting pot of cultures clashing over nothing really and showing what can happen if this goes too far.It really hits home when tragedy strikes close to Romeo who didn t really ever want to be involved in the first place.It will lead to opening up opportunities to discuss difficult topics like cultural difference, violence and conflict resolution, mateship, loss and redemption.A great read and strong debut novel by Australian author Helen Chebatte that will best appeal to teenage boys 14 and up and teen reading groups From a YA novel called Bro about a fight club and racial tensions with fists punching out the title on the cover, I was expecting ugly brutality I was surprised with vulnerability and sensitivity I thoroughly enjoyed Helen Chebatte s debut novel with its West Side Story feel, set in Western Sydney, with appealing and engaging main characters.Using first person narration, Chebatte takes the reader behind the bravado of the main character, Lebanese Australian teenager Romeo, to expose his vuln From a YA novel called Bro about a fight club and racial tensions with fists punching out the title on the cover, I was expecting ugly brutality I was surprised with vulnerability and sensitivity I thoroughly enjoyed Helen Chebatte s debut novel with its West Side Story feel, set in Western Sydney, with appealing and engaging main characters.Using first person narration, Chebatte takes the reader behind the bravado of the main character, Lebanese Australian teenager Romeo, to expose his vulnerabilities Set in a multicultural school Romeo is caught up in tensions that escalate after he starts dating a girl, and which end disastrously With themes that include identity, belonging, friendship, loyalty, peer pressure, racism, grief, forgiveness and redemption Bro certainly packs a punch Despite a lot of talk about fight club, there are actually only three fight scenes, each rendered effectively without too much gore and horror, however I was moved to tears at the outcome of the final fight, a testament to how engaged I was with the likeable characters.The thing that touched me the most about Bro is the way in which Chebatte renders grief the palpable way it hangs over Romeo s household after the death of his mother, and the way it affects each of the characters in the end.The message about us all being Aussies despite our racial backgrounds is not so subtle, however in the shadow of the Cronulla riots, this is a message for our generation, and the refreshingly diverse voice in Aussie YA fiction is timely.It is a pleasantly light read, dominated by dialogue and would be perfect as a middle school text