10 thoughts on “सात सक्कं त्रेचाळीस

  1. Siddharth Siddharth says:

    On further reflection, this book is just too good for the 4 stars I gave it in the morning It is a series of fragments of the life of Kushank Purandare as he steps out into the big bad world Totally irreverent, sometimes crude, sometimes touching, always with an undercurrent of humour.


  2. Vani Vani says:

    It is a unique book with a distinct language, one of the most under rated first class literature As much as I loved the voice of the text, I totally enjoyed the unconventional flow of the story that unfolds randomly from any point The text, which, on one hand is witty, on the other hand has the potential to wrench your heart Read it for the love of reading, relishing the small sips It cannot be enjoyed in large gulps


  3. Naeem Naeem says:

    Written in the early 70s, this is the one that put Nagarkar on the map The risk here is that the narrative is not temporally linear past, present, and future are mixed together as for example in Heller s catch 22 Nor are the characters introduced the slip in and out of the novel quietly I do not know enough about Marathi novels or South Asian novels to understand why this caused such a stir in its time But I can sense that many of the characteristics of Nagarkar s writing are here s Written in the early 70s, this is the one that put Nagarkar on the map The risk here is that the narrative is not temporally linear past, present, and future are mixed together as for example in Heller s catch 22 Nor are the characters introduced the slip in and out of the novel quietly I do not know enough about Marathi novels or South Asian novels to understand why this caused such a stir in its time But I can sense that many of the characteristics of Nagarkar s writing are here supreme attention to detail characters that haunt you for beingthan real a patronage of fierce truth telling and narrative drive that keeps you turning the pages besides my being lost often Perhaps it is Nagarkar s open exploration of desire coded neither as traditionally Indian nor as obviously modern that stands out as a counterpoint to much written in South Asia If so, then he anticipates much of Rushdie s best work I would read it again in a minute but I might want to read some secondary sources on Nagarkar first.Read it and lets talk about it


  4. Satyajeet Satyajeet says:

    what a pleasure to read, it has been it bothers me the way this book is so underrated and some complaining about not making the head or tail of it ah it s not supposed to be read this way i guess don t worry about understanding the story, let the prose take over you the prose is so delightful.


  5. Sanchita Sanchita says:

    What a fantastic read This is the story of a man and his life, in anything but a chronological order The beginning of the book, while gripping, is a little random because there is little to no introduction of the people in the story But when you stick with it, you can form images of the characters in your head.


  6. Richa Jain Richa Jain says:

    For heaven s sake, how can you write such blatant lies Aren t you ashamed of yourself Seven sixes are forty three What are you staring at the floor for Now rub that nonsense and write the truth Above is an excerpt from the book, and very simply tells the reader the essence it holds That every society, as we see it, is not ideal That not all the pieces fit together, and that its mathematics is often questionable.Published by Harper Perennial, Seven Sixes Are Forty Three is Kiran Nagarkar For heaven s sake, how can you write such blatant lies Aren t you ashamed of yourself Seven sixes are forty three What are you staring at the floor for Now rub that nonsense and write the truth Above is an excerpt from the book, and very simply tells the reader the essence it holds That every society, as we see it, is not ideal That not all the pieces fit together, and that its mathematics is often questionable.Published by Harper Perennial, Seven Sixes Are Forty Three is Kiran Nagarkar s first novel, and was originally written in Marathi as Saat Sakkam Trechalis It s about a college graduate, Kushank Purandare, who recalls moments from his life, with experiences that are unbelievable, depressing, brutal and comic, at the same time.Essentially, the book has no plot line The narration is a first person simple but disintegrated point of view of the Indian society, and falls under no particular genre As you read, the book leaves you wondering if things around are actually the way you see them Because most often, we either try to hide the odds or disregard them altogether But while reading the book, you are caught in a state of unawares as the author presents the odds in front of you stark naked, with no inhibitions at all.The stories of Kushank jump between different flashbacks sometimes it s the loss of a loved one, sometimes it s his sexually starved existence during college days, and sometimes the reminisces of his poverty stricken urban middle class family humour holding strongly onto each piece So while one moment you ll be smiling to yourself, the other moment, you ll be lost deep in thought.The Patent Nonsense Auto Biographies at the end of the book make you chuckle at every other sentence it s a bonus read.It took me a little time to settle with this one And the pieces I read are still scattered in my head If you re looking to read something different from the conventional fictions, you can definitely give it a try This one was only a littlethan average for me I might or might not revisit it later


  7. Ashima Jain Ashima Jain says:

    Originally written in 1974 in Marathi, Saat Sakkam Trechalis was Kiran Nagarkar s debut novel and is considered a landmark in Post Independence Indian literature.Translated in English, Seven Sixes are Forty Three is about Kushank Purandare a writer living off the generosity of friends and lovers who drifts about wallowing in his past and doing odd jobs He reminisces about the people who intersect through his path and this is what forms the narrative.Having read and loved the insanely funny Originally written in 1974 in Marathi, Saat Sakkam Trechalis was Kiran Nagarkar s debut novel and is considered a landmark in Post Independence Indian literature.Translated in English, Seven Sixes are Forty Three is about Kushank Purandare a writer living off the generosity of friends and lovers who drifts about wallowing in his past and doing odd jobs He reminisces about the people who intersect through his path and this is what forms the narrative.Having read and loved the insanely funny Ravan Eddie trilogy and the award winning Cuckold, I found Seven Sixes are Forty Three very scattered in its telling The timeline is non linear past, present and future in total chaos Characters tend to drift in and out and it takes a while to be able to identify them There is also an undercurrent of dark humour which I think was seldom lost on me.However, what was surprising was that despite all of that, I was unable to let go of the book I found myself reading it like a piece of wood drifting on the water not sure where I was headed and why, and yet, no where else I could possibly be.It is one of those books that you can t seem to make sense of, and then at the end, it doesn t even matter


  8. Rakhi Jayashankar Rakhi Jayashankar says:

    To portray the deepest human emotions is the toughest job for a writer Kiran Nagarkar proved to be the master of the art through the book 7643 The plot unravels with a suicide The first chapter sets a deep impact of a mystery thriller but later transforms for a literary fiction The story of Kushank Purandare will stay with the readers forever The pain of reality is sure to mark the name of the author in golden letters in the history of literature.The book and the characters are above time a To portray the deepest human emotions is the toughest job for a writer Kiran Nagarkar proved to be the master of the art through the book 7643 The plot unravels with a suicide The first chapter sets a deep impact of a mystery thriller but later transforms for a literary fiction The story of Kushank Purandare will stay with the readers forever The pain of reality is sure to mark the name of the author in golden letters in the history of literature.The book and the characters are above time and demographics The relationships and how they develop is relatable in any era The volatile narration hooks the readers to the book It is brutally honest and painfully soothing The characterization is the highlight of the book Each character is crafted such that the authenticity is preserved throughout The plot is unconventional and classic It takes us through differences incidents and experiences in the life of Kushank How he deals with different situations differently makes the book a quintessential literary fiction and the detail analysis of the book makes itor less a philosophical fiction.The book is definitely not an easy read One should take time to actually sit down and read the book


  9. Swati Garg Swati Garg says:

    I have been a Kiran Nagarkar fan since I read Cuckold the best historical fiction I ve ever read and this book came highly recommended so I wanted to give it a try The book is something else from what you would normally expect It s dark, it s funny, it s weird and it s comforting at some points and disgusting at others So probably it s like life I think this is the kind of book which everyone will interpret differently at different times.


  10. Chitralekha Chitralekha says:

    Perhaps the only book I ve ever read without paying attention to the name of any of the characters or understanding how any of them are connected In many ways, to read this book is to just drift along, much like the protagonist Not as intensely funny as Ravan and Eddie, in parts it reads like a series of sketches torn from an angsty young writer s notebook, but it s still enjoyable in a hazy I don t know what s going on but I m too comfortable sitting here to go find out kind of way.